California law proposes 3 e-bike classifications

An electric bicycle with pedal assist, but capable of 28 miles per hours, would be banned from bike trails under the proposed law.

An electric bicycle with pedal assist, but capable of 28 miles per hour, would be banned from bike trails under the proposed law. Bikes capable of only 20 miles per hour could use most bike trails.

Bicycle Retailer reports today the California legislature will start hearings Monday on a bill to classify all e-bikes. A similar move is underway in New York State. The Retailer reported:

“AB-1096, sponsored by Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco, would create three classifications of e-bikes: Class 1 for pedal-assist bikes, or pedelecs; Class 2 for bikes with throttles; and Class 3 for ‚Äúspeed??? pedelecs. Class 1 and 2 e-bikes would be limited to an assisted speed of 20 miles an hour, while a Class 3 bike could reach an assisted speed of 28 miles an hour.

“The bill also defines where each type of e-bike could be ridden.

“Class 1 bikes could go wherever traditional bikes are allowed, while Class 2 bikes would be limited to paved surfaces. Class 3 bikes would be restricted to roads or bikeways that are adjacent to a road.

“In a nod to concerns from cities and counties, the measure allows local governments to opt out of allowing e-bikes on bike paths or trails.”

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My Commute: Yes, bicycles do get tickets

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The Fullerton, CA, police give bicyclists tickets. This is a good thing.

Commuting home last evening, The Veggie Biker “took the lane” by giving a hand-signal and then swinging across traffic into the left-hand-turn lane on Valencia and stopping at the four-way stop. A policeman was approaching toward him from the other direction. A fixie bike was rolling rapidly just ahead of the police car.

The police car was stopping, as were the cars on the cross street. I made my left-hand turn signal and started to turn.

The fixie blew through the stop sign at about 20 miles per hour and came directly across my path. The kid correctly calculated he could squeeze in front of me, so there was no wreck. But, apparently, without a rear-view mirror, he could know the cop was right behind him.

When I was safely across, the police car accelerated from the stop sign and turned on its lights and pulled the fixie over.

More tickets need to be given to bicyclists who blow through stop signs and lights, ride on the wrong side of the street, and text while riding. Twice, this veggie biker has almost been hit by bicyclists riding on the wrong side of of the street while texting.

Bicyclists who do not obey the law confuse car drivers who are afraid of hitting a biker, or who think bikes should be forced onto the sidewalk. Badly-behaved bikers make the streets unsafe for law-biding bicyclists.

More tickets, please, sir!