California law proposes 3 e-bike classifications

An electric bicycle with pedal assist, but capable of 28 miles per hours, would be banned from bike trails under the proposed law.

An electric bicycle with pedal assist, but capable of 28 miles per hour, would be banned from bike trails under the proposed law. Bikes capable of only 20 miles per hour could use most bike trails.

Bicycle Retailer reports today the California legislature will start hearings Monday on a bill to classify all e-bikes. A similar move is underway in New York State. The Retailer reported:

“AB-1096, sponsored by Assemblyman David Chiu, D-San Francisco, would create three classifications of e-bikes: Class 1 for pedal-assist bikes, or pedelecs; Class 2 for bikes with throttles; and Class 3 for “speed??? pedelecs. Class 1 and 2 e-bikes would be limited to an assisted speed of 20 miles an hour, while a Class 3 bike could reach an assisted speed of 28 miles an hour.

“The bill also defines where each type of e-bike could be ridden.

“Class 1 bikes could go wherever traditional bikes are allowed, while Class 2 bikes would be limited to paved surfaces. Class 3 bikes would be restricted to roads or bikeways that are adjacent to a road.

“In a nod to concerns from cities and counties, the measure allows local governments to opt out of allowing e-bikes on bike paths or trails.”

Read More

Electric bicycles are not cheating health!

pedal-assist bike

Commuting on a pedal-assist iZip Peak gives the same exercise as a standard bike for the veggie biker, but in half the travel time and very little sweat.

“Riding an electric bicycle is like cheating. You can’t possibly get the same level of exercise as you would on a regular, manually-pedaled bicycle. It just makes sense intuitively, but new research just now being published by the University of Nebraska Omaha’s Exercise Physiology Department torpedoes that notion once and for all.”

QUIKBYKE reports, “After collecting, tabulating and analyzing the data, Master’s Candidate Taylor La Salle reached three key conclusions:

“(1) The actual amount of energy expended by the riders was nearly identical for both modes: electric-assist and manual.

“(2) The biggest difference was in the time it took to complete the circuit; on average riding the eBike took around 1 minute less than in the non-electric mode.

“(3) Significantly, all the riders rated their perceived exertion (RPE) using the ACSM’s scale as being easier using electric mode made. If riding the bike in manual mode was rated 15, riding it in pedal-assist mode was a 10. That’s a huge difference in rider perception between the two modes.”

Read More: http://epedaler.com/blog.cfm?blogid=188

Dutch build freeways for e-bikes

Intercity bicycle motorways dedicated to 30 mph e-bikes could soon get the green light in Holland, reads a press release from the Environmental Transportation Association, a British non-profit insurance company. 

Bikes with the speed of a 50cc moped are popular in Holland and the e-bike freeway would allow commuters to move without frequent stops between four cities.

Germany and Switzerland have established a separate class for higher power electric bicycles. These bikes can travel at speeds of 30mph and face less stringent requirements than mopeds.

Read More

https://www.eta.co.uk/2015/03/10/30-mph-bicycle-motorways-e-bike-commuters/

Hebb Electric bicycle for sale

Hebb 500 watt motor 14 amp battery

2009 Hebb Electroglide 500 Diamond frameIMG_0075.JPG. 500 watt motor, 14 amp battery. Use throttle control while pedaling at 20 mph for over 20 miles. Use as dependable, clean 8-cent-a-day commuter bike or as RV transportation. Always under dealer’s care. Crank assembly and rear cogs and gears completely replaced in January. Battery replaced two years ago and should last a recreational rider a life time. Motor replaced three years ago under warranty.
https://orangecounty.craigslist.org/bik/4933289128.html 

O.C. cities encouraged to write bicycle safety grants

Jan Flory on BikeShare

Jan Flory, Fullerton City Council member, test rides a BikeShare bicycle. Bikeshare, which permits citizens to rent bicycles for short trips around town, is part of the county Active Transportation Program to replace cars with walking, biking and public transportation.

Orange County cities are being encouraged by county officials to write bicycle safety grants in the face of bicycle deaths across The O.C., The Voice of O.C. reports.  They are also trying to educate county citizens that bicycles are not just recreational toys, but are serious commuting options.

Nick Gerda writes, “As local transportation officials ramp up bike safety efforts amidst a rising toll of biking deaths, they’re encouraging cities to apply for millions of dollars in new state grants to fuel construction of more bike and pedestrian projects.”

He reports there is $180 million in Active Transportation Program funding statewide, with another $13 million set aside for Orange County. Active transportation refers to encouraging walking, bicycling and the use of public transportation instead of a car.

City applications are due May 21.

BikeShare stations officially launched in Fullerton

Bike Nation Mechanic, Christian Vallejo was polishing the BikeShare rides before today's dedication ceremony, until early guests started asking questions.

Bike Nation Mechanic, Christian Vallejo was polishing the BikeShare rides before today’s dedication ceremony, until early guests started asking questions.

Inexpensive bicycle rental has come to Fullerton. And it is among the things marking the beginning of the end of the freeway culture.

County Supervisor Shawn Nelson hosted a gaggle of politicians at the South of Commonwealth Parking Garage in a dedication ceremony making official the BikeShare partnership between BikeNation, the County of Orange, the Orange County Transportation Authority and the City of Fullerton.

Nelson said the country is at an end of an era of freeway construction. The future belongs to trains, buses and bicycles.

BikeShare currently has 11 stations across the city. Two more are planned. And two more are hoped for, the BikeShare website reports. Currently, they serve the flat areas of Fullerton. St. Jude Medical Center will have to wait.

BikeShare Map

Blue tags mark BikeShare stations from which you can pick up a bike and ride. The red tags are stations being planned.

The stations consists of bike rack holding a row of bicycles and a vending kiosk where, with the swipe of a credit card, one can purchase a daily, monthly or annual membership permitting one to ride as much as one wants at no extra charge–if one plans trips of less than 30 minutes per bike.

Shawn Nelson

County Supervisor Shawn Nelson takes a turn on a rental bike. It was noted by many he did not wear a helmet for this test ride around the parking plaza.

“Passes cost $5 for a one-day pass and $12 for a 7-day pass. Annual memberships are available to frequent users for $75,” the OCTA website reads. “There is also a discounted $45 annual membership for students. Bike rides lasting longer than 30 minutes will incur an overtime charge of $2 to $5 per 30 minutes.”

Others attending today’s dedication included the mayor pro tem of Fullerton, Greg Sebourn; City Council Woman Jan Flory; and North Orange County Community College District Trustee Leonard Lahtinen.

City of Fullerton Bike Users Subcommittee members

City of Fullerton Bike Users Subcommittee Members Vince Buck, Jane Rand, and John Carroll, speak with City Councilwoman Jan Flory (right of center). The committee reviews policies, plans and projects affecting bicycle travel within the city. The committee meets at 5 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month.

The short ceremony was followed by an opportunity for attendees to ride BikeShare rigs.

Christian Vallejo & Jane Rands

Jane Rands gets an explanation of the gearing on the BikeShare bicycles from Christian Vallejo, Bike Nation Mechanic. The bikes are nearly indestructible because of safe-guards that a first-time user must learn.

The chatter among those bikers attending, who have tried the BikeShare equipment, is one really can ride all day for the price of a membership if one rides from one bike station to another in less than 30 minutes, swaps rides, and then proceeds to the next station in under 30 minutes.

Only two complaints were heard. The rugged bikes are not speedy, $2,000 touring bikes; and if a rider meets a friend and stops to talk, as happens often in Fullerton, the rider probably will pay BikeShare an overtime charge.

Simple changes in cities increasing bicycle safety

octalogo2Bicycle advocates concerned about bicycle deaths were told Monday authorities are already “collecting low-hanging fruit” to solve bike safety challenges, according to The Voice of O.C.

At a workshop in Irvine, Orange County Transportation Authority officials told dozens of activists of initial successes, writes Nick Gerda. Irvine saw a 27-percent reduction in traffic collisions involving bicycles from 2012 to 2013 with the city on a similar track this year, said city police Lt. Tom Allan, after simple outreach programs.

  • Irvine City staffers visit schools to educate teenagers about safe routes to schools, and have held 11 bike rodeos to teach bike safety to children.
  • Irvine law enforcement officials said they’ve had success with diversion, in which they allow youth cyclists who get tickets to take a safety class instead of going to traffic court.

Others listed similar small changes that are yielding results.

  • Orange County sheriff’s Deputy Mike Matranga encouraged cyclists to call cities and report issues such as cars cutting off bikes or driving too close so officials can locate problem spots.
  • Newport Beach biking activist Frank Peters pointed to bicycle-based police as being able to show drivers how bikes behave on the road.

Veggie Biking readers can read the lengthy Voice of O.C. article at: http://www.voiceofoc.org/county/article_83722070-c50b-11e3-8b94-001a4bcf887a.html