O.C. cities encouraged to write bicycle safety grants

Jan Flory on BikeShare

Jan Flory, Fullerton City Council member, test rides a BikeShare bicycle. Bikeshare, which permits citizens to rent bicycles for short trips around town, is part of the county Active Transportation Program to replace cars with walking, biking and public transportation.

Orange County cities are being encouraged by county officials to write bicycle safety grants in the face of bicycle deaths across The O.C., The Voice of O.C. reports.  They are also trying to educate county citizens that bicycles are not just recreational toys, but are serious commuting options.

Nick Gerda writes, “As local transportation officials ramp up bike safety efforts amidst a rising toll of biking deaths, they’re encouraging cities to apply for millions of dollars in new state grants to fuel construction of more bike and pedestrian projects.”

He reports there is $180 million in Active Transportation Program funding statewide, with another $13 million set aside for Orange County. Active transportation refers to encouraging walking, bicycling and the use of public transportation instead of a car.

City applications are due May 21.

BikeShare stations officially launched in Fullerton

Bike Nation Mechanic, Christian Vallejo was polishing the BikeShare rides before today's dedication ceremony, until early guests started asking questions.

Bike Nation Mechanic, Christian Vallejo was polishing the BikeShare rides before today’s dedication ceremony, until early guests started asking questions.

Inexpensive bicycle rental has come to Fullerton. And it is among the things marking the beginning of the end of the freeway culture.

County Supervisor Shawn Nelson hosted a gaggle of politicians at the South of Commonwealth Parking Garage in a dedication ceremony making official the BikeShare partnership between BikeNation, the County of Orange, the Orange County Transportation Authority and the City of Fullerton.

Nelson said the country is at an end of an era of freeway construction. The future belongs to trains, buses and bicycles.

BikeShare currently has 11 stations across the city. Two more are planned. And two more are hoped for, the BikeShare website reports. Currently, they serve the flat areas of Fullerton. St. Jude Medical Center will have to wait.

BikeShare Map

Blue tags mark BikeShare stations from which you can pick up a bike and ride. The red tags are stations being planned.

The stations consists of bike rack holding a row of bicycles and a vending kiosk where, with the swipe of a credit card, one can purchase a daily, monthly or annual membership permitting one to ride as much as one wants at no extra charge–if one plans trips of less than 30 minutes per bike.

Shawn Nelson

County Supervisor Shawn Nelson takes a turn on a rental bike. It was noted by many he did not wear a helmet for this test ride around the parking plaza.

“Passes cost $5 for a one-day pass and $12 for a 7-day pass. Annual memberships are available to frequent users for $75,” the OCTA website reads. “There is also a discounted $45 annual membership for students. Bike rides lasting longer than 30 minutes will incur an overtime charge of $2 to $5 per 30 minutes.”

Others attending today’s dedication included the mayor pro tem of Fullerton, Greg Sebourn; City Council Woman Jan Flory; and North Orange County Community College District Trustee Leonard Lahtinen.

City of Fullerton Bike Users Subcommittee members

City of Fullerton Bike Users Subcommittee Members Vince Buck, Jane Rand, and John Carroll, speak with City Councilwoman Jan Flory (right of center). The committee reviews policies, plans and projects affecting bicycle travel within the city. The committee meets at 5 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month.

The short ceremony was followed by an opportunity for attendees to ride BikeShare rigs.

Christian Vallejo & Jane Rands

Jane Rands gets an explanation of the gearing on the BikeShare bicycles from Christian Vallejo, Bike Nation Mechanic. The bikes are nearly indestructible because of safe-guards that a first-time user must learn.

The chatter among those bikers attending, who have tried the BikeShare equipment, is one really can ride all day for the price of a membership if one rides from one bike station to another in less than 30 minutes, swaps rides, and then proceeds to the next station in under 30 minutes.

Only two complaints were heard. The rugged bikes are not speedy, $2,000 touring bikes; and if a rider meets a friend and stops to talk, as happens often in Fullerton, the rider probably will pay BikeShare an overtime charge.

OCTA Active Transportation Coordinator search ends April 20

busbikeheaderApplications for an Active Transportation Coordinator at the Orange County Transportation Authority ends April 20.

The position, among other things:

  • Serves as OCTA’s single point-of-contact and liaison to the active transportation community including, but not limited to, the Orange County Bicycle Coalition, Safe Routes to Schools, and OCTA Citizens Advisory Committee. Responds to public inquiries. Supports public outreach efforts and attends outreach events.
  • Leads the development and implementation of OCTA pedestrian/bicycle policies.
  • Shares and promotes best practices for pedestrian/bicycle infrastructure policies, design and implementation.
  • Leads the development, monitoring, and tracking of the implementation of the OCTA Active Transportation Plan and established pedestrian/bicycle program performance measures.
  • Represents OCTA on state and regional bicycle/pedestrian committees convened by SCAG, Caltrans, and other agencies as appropriate.
  • ETC.

Qualifications include knowing:

  • Bicycle and pedestrian design concepts and safety issues.
  • Principles of transportation planning with emphasis in active transportation.
  • The relationships between active transportation, land use, economy, and overall sustainability.
  • Bicycle and pedestrian program development.
  • Policy development, communication and implementation methods.
  • Principles and techniques of effective communication, including written, visual and public speaking.
  • Computer software skills
  • Project management techniques and systems.
  • Research and statistical methods and techniques.
  • (WALKING ON WATER NOT INCLUDED AT THIS TIME)

This position is in Salary Grade R: Min $62,358.40 – Mid $78,998.40 – Max $95,617.60 per year. The hiring range for this position is from $62,358.40 to $82,948.32 per year, the announcement reads.

 

 

Simple changes in cities increasing bicycle safety

octalogo2Bicycle advocates concerned about bicycle deaths were told Monday authorities are already “collecting low-hanging fruit” to solve bike safety challenges, according to The Voice of O.C.

At a workshop in Irvine, Orange County Transportation Authority officials told dozens of activists of initial successes, writes Nick Gerda. Irvine saw a 27-percent reduction in traffic collisions involving bicycles from 2012 to 2013 with the city on a similar track this year, said city police Lt. Tom Allan, after simple outreach programs.

  • Irvine City staffers visit schools to educate teenagers about safe routes to schools, and have held 11 bike rodeos to teach bike safety to children.
  • Irvine law enforcement officials said they’ve had success with diversion, in which they allow youth cyclists who get tickets to take a safety class instead of going to traffic court.

Others listed similar small changes that are yielding results.

  • Orange County sheriff’s Deputy Mike Matranga encouraged cyclists to call cities and report issues such as cars cutting off bikes or driving too close so officials can locate problem spots.
  • Newport Beach biking activist Frank Peters pointed to bicycle-based police as being able to show drivers how bikes behave on the road.

Veggie Biking readers can read the lengthy Voice of O.C. article at: http://www.voiceofoc.org/county/article_83722070-c50b-11e3-8b94-001a4bcf887a.html

Goodbye! “Share the Road” confusing drivers

sharetheroadNOTFrom the Institute of Transportation Engineers Pedestrian and Bike Council Spring 2014 Newsletter.

“Share The Road”: It’s practically the national motto of cycling advocacy in the United States.

It’s the cycling “message” on license plates in Colorado, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin.

But not in Delaware. In fact, as of last November, just the opposite.

In November, the Delaware Department of Transportation announced that, effective immediately, Delaware would stop using the MUTCD-approved “Share The Road” plaque (W16-1P). More, the department would also start removing all “Share The Road” signs currently installed in Delaware.

How did the state’s cycling advocacy group Bike Delaware react to the announcement that Delaware’s department of transportation was abandoning “Share The Road?” Were there howls of outrage and a letter writing campaign to protest? Actually, Bike Delaware just said “Goodbye ‘Share The Road'”.

Despite its ubiquity and apparent iconic status, it turned out that “Share The Road” is actually an example of common ground between traffic engineers and cycling advocates. We both hated it and for the same reason: its unresolvable ambiguity.

For traffic engineers, with our many years of experience with traffic control devices, “Share The Road” is yet another example of “feel good” signage that placates an interest group but has no safety benefit and adds useless and distracting clutter to the visual landscape.

For cyclists in Delaware (and elsewhere), “Share The Road” had long been interpreted as a sign primarily directed at motorists. Cyclists thought it meant something like “Motorists: be cool.” But for many motorists, “Share The Road” is often interpreted as a sign primarily directed at cyclists and meant something more like“Bicyclists: don’t slow me down.” But we finally realized (after years of pointless yelling back and forth between cyclists and motorists, both yelling “Share The Road” at each other!), that “Share The Road” not only doesn’t help, it actually contributes to conflict and confusion.

“Bicycle May Use Full Lane”

In Delaware, our important task now is to figure out the warrant for the “Bicycle May Use Full Lane” sign.

Perhaps the biggest point of conflict between motorists and cyclists is when cyclists “take the lane” (e.g. cycle in the middle of a travel lane on narrow two lane roads with double yellow lines and without any shoulders). This can sometimes make motorists traveling behind angry. But there is a solid reason that cyclists sometimes ride like this.

Riding at the right hand edge of a travel lane is an invitation for cars behind to pass. That’s fine. But where a double yellow line also exists, it is very easy for a motorist to interpret the combination of the cyclist at the right hand edge of the lane and the double yellow line separating her lane from the lane of oncoming traffic as an invitation to pass in the travel lane. But on roads where the travel lanes are only 10 or 11 feet, this is a potentially catastrophic misunderstanding. The only way for a motorist to safely pass a cyclist when the travel lane is that narrow is to (at least partially) exit her travel lane (into the lane of oncoming traffic).

This type of situation is an example of where the Bicycle May Use Full Lane (and shared lane pavement markings) can both help. The sign delivers a clear traffic control message that makes an ambiguous and confusing traffic situation clearer – for both motorists and cyclists. It’s a big, big improvement over that other sign…what was it called again?
wilson_luszcz-240x177
James Wilson is the executive director of Bike Delaware. 
Mark Luszcz is the chief traffic engineer of the Delaware Department of Transportation.

Biking, walking alliance tells Santa Ana to be bike friendly

voiceofoclogoSanta Ana has a chance to become a bike-friendly city, Jeff Miller, the president and CEO of the nationwide Alliance for Biking & Walking said during a presentation at the Garfield Community Center April 8.

“None of us should be not able to get where we want to go,??? the Voice of O.C. reported Miller said.

According to The Voice of O.C., “The event brought together Santa Ana officials from the library, public works and planning departments and representatives of Orange County Bicycle Coalition, Latino Health Access and Santiago Creek Greenway Alliance, among others.”

Veggie Biking readers can read the article at: http://www.voiceofoc.org/oc_central/santa_ana/article_c269efb2-bf28-11e3-81ec-0019bb2963f4.html